How do we think about agriculture in America? How should we think about it? And, how is food security affecting us in today’s COVID-19 crisis?

 

Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by Laurie Ristino, a food security expert with Johns Hopkins University, to discuss food security, the idea of rural resilience, today’s “food movement,” impacts of the Farm Bill and more.  

 

What is food security? And, what is the urgency today? Laurie explains that food security is the idea that all people, at all times, should have access to physical, social, and economic access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs.  Laurie and Aaron connect these ideas to today’s current pandemic. Will we have enough food? How are rising unemployment rates going to impact our country’s ability to provide access to quality foods? Aaron and Laurie tackle these questions, touching on the pressing notion of food being a question of wealth and thus the implications of America’s wealth gap on health and accessibility.

 

Today’s episode focuses on answering some of the biggest questions surrounding food security, as well as conversely, food insecurity. How do we produce our food? Where does our food come from? How do we use our resources? Laurie and Aaron talk about sustainable versus ‘industrial’ agriculture, the relationship between climate change and food production, the intersection between environmental law and agriculture, as well as how today’s movements and decisions will translate into more governance and policy.

 

Laurie is a policy and law expert on food security, the farm bill, climate change, ecosystem services, and land conservation. Her work is concerned with reforming existing law and policy and developing new policy and civil society innovations to address climate change, social injustice, and to improve environmental and economic sustainability. Laurie has published articles, Op-Eds, and blogs proposing reforms to address soil, water, and air quality degradation, among other topics and is the co-author and editor of a comprehensive book on conservation easements, titled A Changing Landscape: The Conservation Reader.

 

Laurie practiced law for twenty years, serving as a senior counsel at the USDA where she advised on an array of natural resource and environmental matters. Currently, Professor Ristino advises leading NGOs and foundations on environmental policy and strategy matters through her consulting firm, Strategies for a Sustainable Future.  

 

 

 

To learn more about Professor Ristino, please visit her bio page at Johns Hopkins here.

To learn more about Professor Ristino’s firm, Strategies for a Sustainable Future, and to access other resources on this topic, please click here.

 

Host: Aaron Freiwald

Guests: Laurie Ristino

 

 

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How do we think about race? How do we think about the history of racism in the law?

 

Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by Professor Ariela Gross, of the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, to discuss the notion of race, racism, and the laws of freedom. Ariela is the co-author of a new book that explores today’s topic; Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana, tells the story of enslaved and free people of color who used the law to claim freedom and citizenship for themselves and their loved ones.

 

Looking closely at three slave societies – Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana – Ariela and her co-author, Alejandro de la Fuente, demonstrate that the law of freedom, not slavery, established the meaning of blackness in law. In today’s conversation, Aaron and Ariela discuss how the laws of freedom were used to determine if it was possible to move from slave status to freedom, and whether or not claims to citizenship would be tied to racial identity. Ariela and Aaron map the history of law and cover a wide array of topics, including: 1690 Havana, white supremacy, claims of identity, Spanish legal practices, the origins of law, “free soil” arguments, and more.

 

What can this history teach us? And, how does it compare to today?

 

The John B. and Alice R. Sharp Professor of Law and History at USC, Dr. Gross received both her JD and PhD in History from Stanford. Ariela teaches Contracts, History of American Law, and Race and Gender in the law. Her research and writing focus on race and slavery in the United States. In 2017-18, Ariela was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, and an American Council of Learned Societies Collaborative Research Fellow. She received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Frederick J. Burkhardt Fellowship of the American Council of Learned Societies, and an NEH Huntington Library Long-Term Fellowship to support her research for her 2008 book, What Blood Won’t Tell: A History of Race on Trial in America. In 2010, Ariela was appointed a Distinguished Lecturer by the Organization of American Historians and has been part of the USC Gould faculty since 1996. 

 

 

 

 

For more information on Professor Gross, please visit her bio page here.

To check out Professor Gross’ new co-authored book, Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana, please click here.

 

 

Host: Aaron Freiwald

Guests: Ariela Gross 

 

 

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Do electronic medical records actually help improve medical care? Is it possible they hinder it?

 

Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by Professor Sharona Hoffman, of the School of Law at Case Western Reserve University, to discuss the role of electronic medical record systems, often shortened to EMR or EHR (electronic health record), and how they really affect the medical care we receive.

 

Sharona’s book, Electronic Health Records and Medical Big Data: Law and Policy, provides an in-depth understanding of EMR systems, how big data is handled in the medical industry, and the regulations surrounding our personal information. In today’s conversation, Aaron and Sharona are delving into all of the ups and downs of electronic medical records, discussing data security and patient privacy, the power of computerization, Medicare spending and the notion of upcoding, the law’s response to these systems, and more. What should patients be aware of? Are we being overcharged? What are the difficulties in digitizing records? And moreover, why aren’t we hearing more about it?

 

A graduate of Harvard Law, Professor Hoffman is the Edgar A. Hahn Professor of Law at Case Western Reserve University, as well as a Professor of Bioethics and a Co-Director of the Law School’s Law-Medicine center. She teaches Health Law courses, Employment Discrimination, and Civil Procedure. Sharona was voted First Year Teacher of the Year in 2011 and 2012. She also served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs from 2006 to 2009 and won the 2014 Distinguished Teacher Award.

 

Before she was an academic, Professor Hoffman was a Senior Trial Attorney at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Houston, a litigation associate at O’Melveny & Myers in L.A., and a judicial clerk for U.S. District Judge Douglas W. Hillman in the Western District of Michigan. An established author, Sharona has published over sixty articles and book chapters on health law and civil rights issues. She has developed particular expertise and a national reputation in the area of health information technology, with her work appearing in the Georgetown Law Journal, William & Mary Law Review, the Boston College Law Review, and many others.

 

 

For more information on Professor Hoffman, please visit her bio page here.

To check out Prof. Hoffman’s book, Electronic Health Records and Medical Big Data: Law and Policy, please click here

 

 

Host: Aaron Freiwald

Guests: Sharona Hoffman  

 

 

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What happens when companies don’t keep their promises to consumers?

 

Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by Teel Lidow, a Harvard Law graduate and the CEO of FairShake, to discuss consumer rights and the many ways in which big companies can take advantage of customers.

 

After he was made to endure an unscheduled 72-hour delay while traveling, Teel had an idea. Because he had gone to law school, Teel knew better than to sign the airline’s proposed non-disclosure agreement after his ordeal but he noticed that most passengers hadn’t made the same choice – he began to ask himself just how often, and in what ways, larger corporations take advantage of unsuspecting consumers. Teel started FairShake to help level the playing field. In this episode, Aaron and Teel discuss Teel’s experiences, what it is he’s found and how he’s standing up for the everyday person, as well as the notions of mandatory arbitration, consumer contracts, contract disputes, and more.

 

How do you know when you have a valid customer complaint? What are your options? And does everyone really have access to the law? Listen in to find out more.  

 

 

For more information on Teel and FairShake please visit the website here.

(Please note that we are not affiliated with FairShake in any way.)

 

Host: Aaron Freiwald

Guests: Teel Lidow  

 

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What do the grizzly Manson murders tell us today about long-term prison sentences? How do we regard people who commit violent crimes?

 

Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by Professor Hadar Aviram, of the University of California Hastings College of Law, to discuss punishment and parole, as well as Hadar’s new book on the subject, Yesterday’s Monsters: The Manson Family Cases and the Illusion of Parole.

 

In today’s episode, Aaron and Hadar talk about the criminal system, the notion of parole, social science, empathy, public opinion on punishment and more. Using the Manson Family murders to illustrate these ideas, Hadar and Aaron consider the flaws of our system, the origins of parole and whether or not violent offenders are redeemable. Hadar’s new book offers a perspective on extreme punishment, examining the infamous murders committed by Charles Manson and his “family” of followers. Through 50 years of parole transcripts, Hadar argues that these high-profile cases helped institutionalize severe criminal penalties and transformed our understanding of parole in general.

 

Who decides if these criminal offenders are worthy of a second chance? And, how?

 

Professor Aviram specializes in criminal justice, civil rights, law and politics, and social movements. Her research­­ employs socio-legal perspectives and methodologies. Hadar publishes, teaches, and speaks on domestic violence, behavioral perspectives on prosecutorial and defense behavior, unconventional family units, animal rights, elder abuse, public trust in the police, correctional policy and budgeting, violence reduction, theoretical trends in crime and punishment, and the history of female crime and punishment. One of the leading voices nationwide against mass incarceration, Professor Aviram is a frequent media commentator on politics, immigration, criminal justice policy, civil rights, and the Trump Administration. Her blog, California Correctional Crisis, covers criminal justice policy in California.

 

For more information on Professor Aviram, please visit her bio page here.

For more information on Professor Aviram’s latest book, Yesterday’s Monsters: The Manson Family Cases and the Illusion of Parole, please click here.

 

 

Host: Aaron Freiwald

Guests: Hadar Aviram

 

 

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Facebook: @GOODLAWBADLAW

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