Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by bestselling author, Emanuel (Manu) Rosen, to discuss his new book, If Anyone Calls, Tell Them I Died: A Memoir.

 

The Holocaust and its aftermath were not often discussed in families of second-generation survivors; in Tel Aviv in the 1960s, Emanuel Rosen grew up hearing the keys of his mother’s typewriter but had no idea about the battle she was fighting. In his latest book, If Anyone Calls, Tell Them I Died, Emanuel tells the story of his mother’s struggle but it’s a story that spans three generations. Emanuel tells the true story of grandparents, daughter, and grandson, and today, shares details of his family’s life journey with Aaron, a story filled with loss, guilt, lengthy court proceedings, secret letters, and love, while explaining the broader contexts of his book and how this incredible story is one that should serve as a stark reminder.

 

Emanuel is a bestselling author whose books have been translated into thirteen languages. He was born in Israel where he went to school, served in the army, and was an award-wining copywriter. After his graduate school education in the United States and a successful career as an executive in Silicon Valley, Emanuel turned to writing. His first book, The Anatomy of Buzz, was a national bestseller and his third book, Absolute Value (with Stanford professor Itamar Simsonson ), won the 2016 American Marketing Association Best Book Award.

 

Emanuel was previously vice president of marketing at Niles Software, where he launched the company’s flagship product, EndNote. His work has been featured in the Harvard Business Review, Time, Advertising Age, and many other media. If Anyone Calls, Tell Them I Died is his fourth book.

 

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To check out Emanuel’s new book, If Anyone Calls, Tell Them I Died: A Memoir, please click here.

To learn more about Emanuel, please check out his website here.

 

Host: Aaron Freiwald

Guest: Emanuel (Manu) Rosen

 

 

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Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by author and journalist, Jim Tracy, to discuss his brand-new book, Sworn to Silence: The Truth Behind Robert Garrow and the Missing Bodies' Case, and the impact the Robert Garrow case has had on the legal field, law school curriculums, and the notion of attorney-client privilege.

 

In our first ever true-crime episode, Aaron speaks to Jim Tracy, a veteran reporter and published author, to discuss his new book about infamous serial-killer, Robert Garrow. Jim has a personal connection to the Garrow case and explores this and more throughout today’s episode.

 

Robert Garrow was an American serial rapist and later spree killer who was active in New York during the 1970s. In today’s episode, Jim explains the twists and turns of the Garrow story that began when Robert Garrow went on an 18-day killing spree, stabbing four people to death before being apprehended – Garrow went on his spree after committing several rapes, and as you will hear, most likely after committing several other grisly murders.

 

The Garrow case begins with the horrific acts of Robert Garrow, but as Aaron and Jim discuss, there is much more to the story. In his book and throughout today’s episode, Jim tells the amazing and unforgettable tale of two American lawyers who did the unthinkable, the unprecedented – they found themselves balancing their client’s unforgivable secrets with their oaths as officers of the court. Today, the Garrow case is considered a landmark legal story that is studied and analyzed in law schools worldwide. The events of Garrow’s terror in the Adirondack Mountains has been indelibly marked in Tracy’s mind since he was eight years old and in Sworn to Silence, he weaves together a true crime narrative that should rank with some of the most compelling American crime stories of modern times; he does so while taking the reader on a riveting journey back to the 1970s, unveiling an American killer most people have never heard of, and explaining the groundbreaking legal implications this story has had on our modern understanding of attorney-client privilege.

 

Jim Tracy has won multiple national and state writing awards, including placing first in the prestigious Associated Press Sports Editor contest. He spent a considerable amount of his career with the Pulitzer Prize winning newspaper, The Post-Star, a publication in Glens Falls, N.Y. Prior to his successful career in journalism, Tracy was a former aide to New York State Senor Norman Levy. A graduate of the State University of New York, Jim was born, raised and still resides in the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains, where today’s story takes place. Jim has spoken publicly about the Garrow case at several historical societies and continues to be interviewed for his knowledge and experience with the case.

 

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To check out Jim’s new book, Sworn to Silence: The Truth Behind Robert Garrow and the Missing Bodies' Case, please click here.

 

Host: Aaron Freiwald

Guest: Jim Tracy

 

 

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Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by returning guest and friend of the podcast, professor Stephen Vladeck, of the University of Texas at Austin, School of Law, to discuss the U.S. Supreme Court and the notion of its secretive “shadow docket.”

 

In today’s episode, Stephen returns to our show to discuss an obscure legal procedure known as, the “shadow docket.” Throughout today’s conversation, Aaron and Stephen explore just what exactly this is, what it means for the country, how it impacts democracy, and how it is being used. Cases on this docket can effectively be decided quickly and quietly – sometimes even without knowing all of the evidence; they can be resolved even when lower cases are still processing them and without providing explanations and/or signed opinions. Stephen and Aaron address the dangers that this type of power can have and whether or not there are any checks and balances in place in our system to keep these powers regulated.

 

Professor Vladeck holds the Charles Alan Wright Chair in Federal Courts at the University of Texas School of Law and is a nationally recognized expert on the federal courts, constitutional law, national security law, and military justice. Stephen has argued before the U.S. Supreme Court, the Texas Supreme Court, and lower federal civilian and military courts; he has served as an expert witness in both U.S. state and federal courts and in foreign tribunals. Professor Vladeck has received numerous awards for his influential and widely-cited legal scholarship, his popular writing, his teaching, and his service to the legal profession.

 

Professor Vladeck is also a host of his own podcast, the National Security Law Podcast, which he co-hosts with Professor Bob Chesney. He is CNN’s Supreme Court analyst and a co-author of Aspen Publishers’ leading national security law and counterterrorism law casebooks. He is the executive editor of the Just Security blog and a senior editor of the Lawfare blog.

 

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To learn more about Professor Vladeck, please click here.

To check out Professor Vladeck’s co-hosted podcast, the National Security Law Podcast, please click here.

To read the Reuters’ article, “The 'shadow docket': How the U.S. Supreme Court quietly dispatches key rulings,” in which Professor Vladeck was quoted, please click here.

 

Host: Aaron Freiwald

Guest: Stephen Vladeck

 

 

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Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by law professor, Amanda Frost, of the Washington College of Law at American University, to discuss the rights of citizenship, citizenship stripping and denaturalization, sexism and xenophobia, as well as Professor Frost’s new book, You Are Not American: Citizenship Stripping from Dred Scott to the Dreamers. What is citizenship? Who is a citizen? And furthermore, who decides the answers to these questions?

 

In today’s conversation, Aaron and Amanda have an incredibly relevant conversation about citizenship in the United States. Citizenship is invaluable and yet, as Amanda explains, it is always at risk. In her new book, Amanda explores the history of citizenship and citizenship stripping over the last two centuries – she explains that the U.S. government has used revoking citizenship (even from those born on American soil) as a tool to cast out its unwanted, suppress dissent, and deny civil rights to all considered “un-American.” Amanda and Aaron talk about the historical aspects of citizenship challenges but also those of today, touching on the events of the last four years and Trump’s repeated threats of deportation/denaturalization, the issues of race and equality, the notion of political power and the right to vote, as well as the Supreme Court, the civil war, and the idea of community, membership and belonging.

 

Amanda Frost is the Ann Loeb Bronfman Distinguished Professor of Law. Amanda writes and teaches in the fields of constitutional law, immigration and citizenship law, federal courts and jurisdiction, and judicial ethics. Her scholarship has been cited by over a dozen federal and state courts, and she has been invited to testify on the topics of her articles before both the House and Senate Judiciary Committees. Professor Frost’s non-academic writing has been published in The Atlantic, Slate, The American Project, the Washington Post, the New York Times, and USA Today, and she authors the “American round-up” column for SCOTUSblog. Amanda is a member of the Editorial Board of Oxford University’s Border Criminologies, an Academic Fellow at the Pound Civil Justice Institute, and a member of the National Constitution Center’s Coalition of Freedom Advisory Board; she has been a visiting professor at Harvard Law School, UCLA Law School, Université Paris X Nanterre, and the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany.

 

Before entering academia, Professor Frost clerked on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and spent five years as a staff attorney at Public Citizen, where she litigated cases at all levels of the federal judicial system.

 

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To learn more about Professor Frost, please check out her bio at American here.

You can also learn more about Professor Frost by visiting her personal website here.

To check out Professor Frost’s new book, You Are Not American: Citizenship Stripping from Dred Scott to the Dreamers, please click here.

 

Host: Aaron Freiwald

Guest: Amanda Frost

 

 

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Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by Professor Cristina Rodríguez, of Yale Law School, to discuss immigration law, President Joe Biden, executive power and what the future of immigration could look like.

 

Who controls American immigration policy? In today’s episode, Aaron and Cristina discuss this question and more, as well as Cristina’s new co-authored book on the topic, The President and Immigration Law. The biggest immigration controversies of the last decade have all involved policies produced by the President – policies such as President Obama’s decision to protect Dreamers from deportation and President Trump’s proclamation banning immigrants from several majority-Muslim nations. Cristina and Aaron talk about this idea of executive decision-making and how it has shaped our immigration system. Aaron and Cristina touch on the notions of power, status, oversight, voter suppression, and resentment as they explore the ins and outs of our country’s immigration history, the impact of partisan policies, and the roles of the President and Congress. The President and Immigration Law chronicles the untold story of how, over the course of two centuries, the President became our immigration policymaker-in-chief and offers a blueprint for reform.

 

Professor Rodríguez is the Leighton Homer Surbeck Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Her fields of research include constitutional law and theory, immigration law and policy, administrative law and process, and citizenship theory. In recent years, her work has focused on constitutional structures and institutional design. She has used immigration law and related areas as vehicles through which to explore how the allocation of power (through federalism, the separation of powers, and the structure of the bureaucracy) shapes the management and resolution of legal and political conflict. Her work has also examined the effects of immigration on society and culture, as well as the legal and political strategies societies adopt to absorb immigrant populations. Professor Rodríguez joined Yale Law after serving for two years as Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Office of Legal Counsel at the U.S. Department of Justice. She earned her B.A. and J.D. degrees from Yale and attended Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar. Following law school, Professor Rodríguez clerked for Judge David S. Tatel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and Justice Sandra Day O’Connor of the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

Listen now to learn more!

 

To check out, The President and Immigration Law, please click here.

To learn more about Professor Rodríguez please visit her bio page here.

To learn more about Professor Rodríguez’s co-author, Professor Adam Cox, please visit his bio page here.

 

Host: Aaron Freiwald

Guest: Cristina Rodríguez

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